Category Archives: Featured Authors

Lil Wayne on BLM

“If it ain’t got nothing to do with me, I’m not connecting to it.” These words angered a lot of black people in regards to Lil’ Wayne’s response about the group Black Lives Matter. What society has to realize is that athletes and entertainers don’t sign up to be role models. They live their life the way they are able to. So when Wayne or Cam Newton make a comment that you don’t agree with, don’t take it to heart. 

Wayne has been a successful rapper for many years and has been a celebrity since his young teenage years. The privileged rapper has admitted to never experiencing racism in his life on multiple aired interviews. Why is this coming off as a surprise to people for his actions? He is rich and has been for majority of his life. He has also admitted that he believes a part of the reason he hasn’t experienced racism is because he is a celebrity. That is perfectly fine. The issue that most BLM supporters should be upset with is 1. How Lil’ Wayne made it seem like he never heard of BLM. And 2. How the reporter poorly explained what BLM was “supposed” to mean as she chuckled. 

Every cookie crumbles differently, although we are all human we don’t all go through the same situations. Lil’ Wayne is not a politician and should not have to answer political questions if it does not concern him. He acknowledges that wrongful things have happened to unarmed individuals but, Wayne has not been effected directly by racism. That is just simply the world that he lives in, which is a blessing. Who are we to expose him to the negative world when his only concern is keeping his family out of the harm of the world. 

Understand that there is also no real reason to have Lil’ Wayne on television at the moment no album (unfortunately), book, or movie coming out. This could very well be a distraction from what really matters, the election that is in 6 days. Go vote!

Sidenote: If you didn’t laugh a little when he said, “My life matters, especially to my bitches” you have no sense of humor. 

                                                                -Mizell 

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The Rebirth of Black Entertainment Television 

This is not the greatest ever told comeback story about how the network BET is now moving to be a loveabke station again, no, not its not. This is about the positive image of the black human race while not watering down the true black experience. 

Shows like the Cosby Show, A Different World, Fresh Prince, The Hughley’s, and My Wife and Kids all showed positive family values. The shows mentioned plus many more did not depict a negative view on everyday black life. We don’t all live like drug dealers and ball players. Those shows taught core values while providing a key source of entertainment without forcing religion, sex, and violence on its viewers. 

Our generation needs shows like Black-ish, Luke Cage, Insecure, and Atlanta because it not only shows loveable and memorable black characters but it depicts us how “we” see us. Not like animals, criminals, or ignorant, but a fun and goofy family with both parents like in Black-ish (ABC). Or a positive black male role model like in Luke Cage (Netflix). Or black women understanding their worth and fighting for equality in the work environment like in Insecure (HBO). 

The season finale of Atlanta (FX) aired today and yet another episode had me hysterically laughing all while hearing hidden messages often times presented in a question that, “we” around the world have yet to get an answer to. It takes comedy to be so daring to ask those questions. 

The entertainment within these shows provides viewers with a more accurate insight on what black people go through. And it’s about time because I believe America has begun to assume that all black people live like rap songs. We need our image to be redefined by who our current image is effecting, by us. 

News stations like Fox or CNN always seem to make black people look as criminal as possible. It’s important that the black image, black culture, and black mindset is not altered by what certain gatekeepers allow the world to see. 

                                                                   -Mizell

“Sole”Searching at the High

By: Kyndell Mizell

I experienced a small part of sneaker heaven last Sunday at the High Museum in Atlanta, Georgia. It was the closing day of the sole-full exhibit “The Rise of the Sneaker Culture.” The only thing that made the exhibit that much better was that it was free! (Due to one of many free promotions the High Museum runs each month.) Lines filled the room while sneaker-heads of mixed races and genders looked in awe at over a thousand different sneakers. Every shoe was neatly placed in a protective glass case with a small description of the shoe.

There were many other iconic models and tons of brands including Puma, Reebok, KangaRoos, Saucony, PONY, Vans, PF Flyers, Supra, even high end fashion shoes like Gucci and Christian Louboutin. One of the most popular sections of course was the Jordan portion. There was a complete set of the retro Jordan’s in complete order showing some of the best colorways for each style.

The first shoe that caught my eye was a shoe that was shown to the public back in 2015 by Adidas. It is made out of recycled ocean waste to complete the upper and the new iconic boost technology also seen in the ultraboost model and the Yeezyboost collection. This shoe was also my favorite pair and most unexpected pair to see.

There were some models that were hideous like the Nike x Tom Sachs NikeCraft Lunar Underboot Aeroply Experimentation Research Boot which was a prototype created on a white blank boot canvas and designed with a black sharpie. [Photo Courtesy American Federation of Arts] Or, like one of my all-time most hated silhouette the Ewings which are just big and bulky.

The descriptions for each shoe told a significant story and the reason why the shoe was ultimately on display. We were able to learn things like how Adidas got its name from the creator’s actual name Adolf “Adi” Dassler, and what PONY stood for Product of New York, and the fines that Michael Jordan received for his controversial first signature shoe, we even saw the iconic ASICS that Bruce Lee made popular.

One of the funniest models that I saw was the was the Thomas Dutton and Thorowgood running shoe which was popular from 1860-1865 which looked like a loafer with a half inch heel with cleat-like metal spikes. [Photo: Greg Washington Courtesy American Federation of Arts/Bata Shoe Museum]

The exhibit although limited to only 2 rooms and a projector video was perfect. It was amazing overhearing and engaging in the stories with the older sneaker-lovers talking to their kids just reminiscing on the times when they went crazy for the latest trend. Some of the stories weren’t even related to the shoes but referred to the collaborated designers and their sex lives. Watching some of the ladies stare at the Reebok Lifestyle Freestyle Hi sneakers thinking about their days in loud bright workout gear or looking at the old free spirited grandfather explain to his grandchild the significance of the waffle sole on the Vans slip-on was my favorite part of the exhibit.

There were rare shoes not just on display but as well as the many guest in attendance. There were so many smiles and happy people experiencing a snap shot of a pivotal culture together as one. It wasn’t a black or white or thing. The exhibit brought many cultures together to witness the history of one of the fastest growing cultures ever.

If you weren’t in Atlanta to witness the exhibit with The Bold Opinion Show on closing day, you have two more locations to experience the great rise of the sneaker culture. Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky from September 9th through November 27th and Oakland Museum of California from December 22nd to April 2nd 2017.