5 Podcasts to follow for the 2021 Olympics

JannahBBy Jannah Bolds
EIC, The Bold Opinion

 

Despite the controversy in from of this year’s Olympic Games, here’s a short list of notable podcasts for deep convos, exclusive interviews, and unique perspectives leading up to the Tokyo 2021 Games.

  1. Olympic Channel Podcast
    The Olympic Channel Podcast is the official home of exclusive, insightful interviews from coaches, athletes, and participants across the Olympic arena. This production publishes weekly.

  2. Japan Sports Stories
    This podcast explores the untold stories of Japanese sports and the hype leading up to the 2021 Olympic Games. Each episode the podcast team will interview athletes, academics, and sports professionals and dive into Japanese professional sports. Publishing on a weekly basis, this production gives you a unique peek into foreign athletic identities.

  3. Around The Rings
    This Atlanta based podcast keeps listeners updated on the latest Olympic news from an intelligent sports business perspective. Around The Rings publishes on a weekly basis and is a pivotal listen for those interested in the business side of world class athleticism. 

  4. The Podium
    Produced by NBC, this Olympic podcast covers the 17 days of intense training and competition for the Summer Tokyo Games. The Podium takes a deep dive into the personal stories and events that define the special athletes and their efforts to make it to the podium.

  5. Olympic Dreams
    This podcast is exclusive to the San Diego, California professional athlete circle, as it concentrates on athletes in their prime with sights set on representing Team USA in Tokyo. Releasing weekly, tune in to find out how these American athletes rise to the top of their respective sports. 

Podcasts mentioned in this post are not mentioned exclusively and authentically provide insights of professional athletes, their craft, and journey to gold medal status. 

Please visit the official Olympic Games website for official updates and news.

American Privilege; Marijuana Chokes Chances of Olympic Competitor Sha’Carri Richardson

JannahB

By Jannah Bolds
EIC, The Bold Opinion

THC is not classified as a performance enhancing substance. Why is she being punished? A portion of the nation in uproar.

In an age that marijuana production and recreational use becomes more normal as each day passes, someone, somehow, seems to experience negative, life-changing scrutiny over consuming the herb. 

This time, Olympic trial participant, Sha’Carri Richardson fell into the spotlight of controversy as she tested positive for THC, after securing her spot in the 100m dash at a blazing 10.86 seconds. A sentimental victory for the twenty one year old. In an interview, Richardson mentioned that she’d lost her mother shortly before competition; a reasonable circumstance for aided relief.

“We all have our different struggles. We all have our different things we del with. But to put on a face, to have to go in front of the world and put on a face to hide my pain, I don’t know… Who am I to tell you how to cope when you’re dealing with pain or deal with a struggle you’ve never experienced before?”

Sha’Carri Richardson, NBC’s Today Show

Richardson mentioned to have visited the US state of Oregon recently, where reefer is prohibited recreationally; a regional factor, but globally?

That’s the point I’m reaching to communicate here.

Continue reading American Privilege; Marijuana Chokes Chances of Olympic Competitor Sha’Carri Richardson

Twitter Spaces Etiquette

Written by JannahB
EIC, The Bold Opinion

I despise telling grown folks how to behave, but I’ve got good reason this time.

If you haven’t heard by now, Twitter Spaces is Twitter’s new audio drop in chat feature. The feature is still in beta and hasn’t rolled out fully to the public yet. So for the new comers and people still learning the field, here are a few pointers to show how you should work it.

Hosting A Space

Each week, new Twitter users are gaining access to host their own Space. As an audio host to your followers and others, it’s important to keep in mind the following points to lead to a successful, engaging experience.

1) Welcome new listeners periodically 
Show some proper hospitality for your Space. The more welcome your guests feel, the longer their willing to stick around, speak, and provide value to your Space.

2)  Be Vocal
You’re the host. Announce your presence and verbally update you Space with current and past topics so listeners can keep up with the conversation.

3) Don’t Be Afraid To Moderate
Again, it’s your Space and you’re the host.  Keep things orderly by watching speakers overtaking themselves, keeping track of time, maintain a peacefully equal Space, and be mindful of your speaker panel and hot mics.

 

Sharing A Space

I get it, Twitter Spaces is new and exciting and you want to get the best experience possible. However, as a participant in someone else’s Space, it’s helpful to keep in mind a few good practices to enhance the experience.

1) Introductions
When you jump into a Space, you automatically become a listener and won’t have speaker privileges until the host grants you access. Show your presence by throwing up a wave emoji to the Space and mutual followers. If you come in a speaker, verbally announce your presence, in turn, by introducing yourself and thanking the host for hosting the Space.

2)  Fully Utilize Participation Tools
While you’re in a Space, don’t be afraid to use your emojis to express that you’re keeping up with the conversation. You may also post a Tweet to the billboard as a talking point for the Space. To do that, find a relevant tweet, tap the share icon, and tap the option to add the Tweet to the host’s Space.  For bonus points, share out the Space to your timeline and show your followers you’re participating in that Space.

3) Watch Your Speaking Time
As a guest speaker in someone else’s Space, be mindful of the time you spend running your mouth and make room for others to respond to the topic (unless you’re being interviewed). It’s also a good practice to be mindful of your hot mic, so mute yourself when you’re not talking. Nobody wants to hear your cats fighting or rattling dishes in the background because the mics are super sensitive.

4) Bow Out Gracefully
When you’re ready to leave the space and you’ve been an active speaker, it’s polite to announce your departure, if you can help it, and thank the host for hosting the Space.

Again, Twitter Spaces is new and it’s important to learn something and have fun!

Here are other Twitter Spaces topics:
– “Twitter Spaces Is Better Than Clubhouse”
– “Four Ways To Best Utilize Twitter Spaces”
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