The new “Non-Smart” Smartphone?

by Jannah Bolds 

Screen Shot 2016-06-16 at 4.51.52 PM
Sounds quite contradictory right?
Well, in a world where we are all consumed with our smart devices, ideas like this one can present itself as a sense of relief. Don’t get me wrong, I can totally understand where technology is taking the world…Like leading us by hand down a dark alley way (metaphorically speaking).
Maybe that was the wrong metaphor to use, but you get the point that technology is becoming a blinder; blocking us from seeing what goes on around us. We have the option of restricting that blinder, simply by restricting the “smartness”. Thus giving birth to the Runcible.
The Runcible was created by Aubry Anderson, founder and CEO of Monohm Inc., with the intent to create something totally opposite of what smart devices are today.
“Runcible is a new category of mobile device, its palm sized, modeled on the pocket watch, and eccos iconic forms that humans have carried with them and had strong emotional relationships with for ages,” said Anderson in an interview for the Runcible campaign.
“People ask me if Runcible is a phone. It’s more like a highly connected, tablet-computer. It’s phone-like, but you don’t hold it up to your head. You can pair with a bluetooth device, and make phone calls if you really want to,” he said.
If your really into products “Made in America”, then the runcible will get brownie points for you since it’s designed AND made in California.
Did I mention that this device is completely hackable? Well, “hackable” seems a bit negative, so I’ll just say “customizable”. Yes, add what you want, and take off what you want at the software and hardware levels. This devices uses the Open Source initiative.
“Open source is freely available and lives independently with this company or any other where you can always comprehend what the device is doing; and you can change it if you don’t like it…even if we are no longer in the picture. This is a device that you can keep for a long time, fix and upgrade,” said Anderson.
The first Runcible will feature a Snapdragon 410 quad-core processor, bluetooth connectivity, WiFi, 1GB RAM, 8GB flash storage, a rear-facing camera, and exposed GPIO and USB host for further expansion capabilities. 4G LTE will not be used in this version of the Runcible, but the company definitely has plans for it in the future. Remember, it will be a simple upgrade, no replacement device needed.
Now, what about price? Runcible starts at $399 USD with an organic-feeling back made from reclaimed ocean plastic ‘fished out from the Great Pacific Plastic Island’. OR, you can pay an extra $100 and get a hand crafted solid wood back made from local harvested madrone wood from Mendocino County, California.
Wow! So, for those of you who had to re-read that last paragraph a couple times to understand the differences; One is made from plastic, and the other from wood. The plastic is the least expensive lol.
“Runcible is specifically made to avoid pulling you out of the real world, especially if your out there to enjoy it,” said Anderson.
Estimated to release to the public in September 2016.
Interested? For more information on this revolutionary device, click here to check out their website.
Article information: indiegogo.com
Photo credentials: indiegogo.com

That’s it, I’m dropping it all to become a stripper!

Well maybe that headline was a little strong, but I will certainly say that I’ve thought about it jokingly.

Why?

These kind of questions come about when someone, like me, has hit a wall. A wall that can some days seem inpenetratable. I’m talking about breaking into a career. Not just any career, but the career that you set yourself up for. With a college degree and real life experience in the bag, you’d think nailing a job after a couple internships would be a no brainier right?

I’ve come to learn that it’s not just that simple. But why? Why isn’t it THAT simple? I mean, c’mon. We work our butts off in college and prep for internships TO get the degree TO build the resume TO GET THE JOB! That’s what’s frustrating to a young person in a position like this.

Getting turned down two or three times isn’t going to do much damage. But when months turn into years of constant “we regret to inform you” messages, it really hurts. It’s like the world telling you that what you worked your ass off for is not enough. Your degree is not enough, your experience is not enough.

*Let me say something about “not having enough experience”. Well, if I don’t have enough experience, tell me where the hell am I going to get that experience if no one is willing to give me a chance?! If you have the answer, DO SHARE!

When too much time passes, frustrations are high and contemplations get to brewing.

What am I doing wrong? Did I lose my edge? Should I go back to school? Maybe this isn’t what I’m supposed to do. Should I change career paths?

All these questions arise, self esteem decreases, and out of desperation, young professionals start running out of options. But…The motto I’m trying to live by now is:

“When opportunity doesn’t knock, build your own f*cking door.”

Stay tuned…

City of Atlanta moves to improve greenspaces

   Atlanta receives Federal Grants to Improve parks

By Jannah Bolds

 BEN Network Freelance writer 

 By Fall 2016, the City of Atlanta will have worked over 12 months to expand and improve a special area in West Atlanta, Proctor Creek Watershed, and has received over half a million in federal funds to complete it.

A total of $590 thousand has been contributed by three major organizations to construct and make this watershed area more of a greenspace. The National Park Service contributed $280 thousand, which was matched by the Emerald Corridor Foundation. The Trust for Public Land was also able to contribute $30 thousand.

“It is city property that has been laying dormant for decades and the foundation owned a bit also and decided that it was a really natural place near a MARTA station and there was space to create an accessible feature that could have educational value in addition to the trail and exercise spaces that were the subject of the grant,” said Debra Edelson, Executive Director for the Emerald Corridor Foundation. 

The goal of this project is to benefit the community by creating a “greenspace” and to protect the watershed at Proctor Creek. The watershed covers approximately 16 square miles and Proctor Creek runs about nine miles.

Protecting watersheds are necessary for providing clean drinking water, habitats for wildlife, and recreational areas.

“This covers a nine-mile corridor that is currently being underutilized. There are are about 60,000 residents tat live in the neighborhood that have no real access to a greenspace within walking distance, so the goal is to focus on this area,” said Aaron Baspan, Mayors Office of Sustainability Community and Project Manager. 

This project will create indirect jobs initially and will also require specific maintenance in order to keep the greenspace running.

“We will need suppliers that will supply equipment and installation services. This will also create long-term jobs in our Department of Parks and Recreation in order to maintain it,” said Baspan.

Specific features that this new greenspace will include a 1,400-foot pedestrian and bike trail, three adult fitness stations, three children’s pay stations, benches, and spaces for picnic activity and play.

“A key point to make here is that instead of us coming to the table with a perscribed plan, we have a ‘wish list’ that will allow us to take the time to work with the community and hear what their wish list of items would be since it is in their backyard,” said Baspan.

It is the City’s vision to have the park open next summer with 12-14 months of construction. Baspan believes that this project fits into an overall sustainability priority and that if the city can successfully get residents out of their houses into parks, they’re more likely to reinvest their money back into the neighborhood.

He said it will draw businesses, people will want to live there and eventually reshape the city.

 

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