Tag Archives: business

So about this Shea Moisture Hoopla…

Hey Peeps! It’s Jannah B

I’ve come across some online controversy that involved one of my favorite natural hair care brands; Shea Moisture. This is one of the first brands I gravitated to during my natural hair transition back in 2009/2010. My transition was rough, but I got through it after a year and a half. That’s another story though, so I won’t get into detail.

BUT WE ARE HERE to talk about the recent controversy with Shea Moisture’s recent commercial. Here’s a link to the commercial, if you haven’t seen it already.

Shea Moisture Commercial

OK. So now that you’ve seen what people are talking about, hold tight to your questions, comments, and concerns until the very end of this. Take this all in, then make your Bold Opinions 🙂

Controversy: New Shea Moisture commercial integrates other women without kinky or curly hair. Shea Moisture began by marketing their products for women and men of color, specifically kinky and curly hair textures. Now, in 2017, the company releases a commercial with women with naturally straight, fine hair, talking about their love of the product. Since the release of this commercial, the company has received some negative backlash. *See Below, YES these are real*

(Feel some type of way after reading those comments? Remember to comment below and take the poll)

Why I think this is ridiculous: 
1) All you backlash givers should have a few seats.
*offers memory foam cushioned, kente cloth embossed stool, for all you extra woke folks*

Please have a nice long seat because this brand has been around WAY before any of the natural hair became “popular”. I say “popular” because we all know that there was a “natural wave” that popped up bout a decade ago. Some people stuck with it, others didn’t. It’s life.

I saw where people were complaining about SM (Shea Moisture) not being loyal to their customers and that they were becoming “white washed”.
Really -__-

Ok then, well what about the previous commercials and marketing techniques? Plenty of women with “4C” hair types and darker skin complexions in those productions. Bet you haven’t seen those, eh? Just jumped on the bash-bandwagon, eh? Ok so let me point you in the right direction. Check these vids on their Channel
What’s Normal?
#EveryBodyGetsLove
Shea Moisture London Store Launch
Bleached hair care (I recommend skipping to 2:30-5:30)

AND they have men’s products for beard and shave! Are my guys out there complaining since there are NO MEN in any of their commercials?
I thought so. Have a seat.

So now that people see that the brand is trying to expand and offer their products to ALL HAIR TYPES, it’s a problem? Yes, SM started out marketing to the kinky, curly hair types, but guess what… It’s time for growth. Business growth.

2) It’s called Business
Hey, the brand is expanding. It has its foundation, the curly haired customers, and now wants to market to other hair types (AKA be placed in more stores, AKA reach a broader audience, AKA MAKE MORE MONEY, AKA BECOME. AN. EMPIRE.) Let them get their coins!

Why stop a black owned business from conducting business how it should be, by expanding and inducing growth? Marketing is doing a spot on job with their efforts, I think. Maybe should emphasize and incorporate more men in their ads an such, but they will get around to it.
Yes, it’s black owned by Sundial Brands, LLC.
I’m a journalist, I research 😉

Also, since when did the term “natural hair” refer to only the kinks, coils, and napps? The definition of Natural is something that Naturally occurs, right? Without alteration, right? So that could include, just about anything, right? Got it.
I think this goes into the phenomena that “we” like to have “our own”. Which is fine because we are slightly different in ways, but let’s not confuse this idea with selfishness. This is just something to ponder on and could potentially turn into an article of itself.

Let me drop a gem on you right quick. Whether you realize it or not, LIFE is a business. Everything has strategy, consequences, and goals for success/ happiness. Remember that.

All in all, Y’ll need to chill on this backlash and if this product works well for YOU and YOUR hair/skin, continue to use it. Y’all are REACHING!

That’s MY BOLD OPINION.

Feel free to comment, like and share this! YOUR Bold Opinion is welcome here 😉

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Image credit: Sheamoisture.com

Third annual PSAFE event unifies creative community, glorifies black business

By Jannah Bolds

Sounds of music, laughter and network filled the air of a tucked-away, graffiti-covered corner of downtown Atlanta, as the Private Society Arts & Fashion Expose (P.S.A.F.E) kicked off its third annual event this weekend.

PSAFE was organized by four pals, Derek Hardge Jr., Patrick Russell, Corey Smith, and Jawaan Washington, all with congruent visions of bringing support and unity to their community.

Local artists, jewelers, fashion enthusiasts, musicians, and chefs packed their display tables with handmade creations. Just about anything under the umbrella of creativity, could be found at PSAFE.

Two of my most memorable encounters at PSAFE came from a seemingly-introverted hula hoop dancer and an overly-passionate nail boutique technician. Why did these two stick out to me? Both ladies caught my eye because, although their personalities were on opposite ends of the spectrum, they both had the exact same reasons for attending – personal growth.

Not only was PSAFE3 their first expo, but it was their first time talking to someone like me, a journalist interested in what made them special / standout.

(After all, this is The Bold Opinion, right?)

So sure, that itself was personally something special for me. I like to be social and when I get the opportunity to integrate that with my brand, I like to leave unique lasting impression.

Hula hooping Samone, despite her quiet nature, was dressed in a loud tribal two-piece with bright blue, feline-esk  face paint, yellow clip-on cat ears, and a lime green streaked bob to top it all off. Not really having much to say wasn’t a bother, her vibe said it all when she grabbed her hoops and hit the stage!

Samone gets into her groove when the music turns on.

Jazmine, owner of ‘My J Nailz’, embodied the characteristics of a “strong black woman”; neatly bunted dreadlocks, square bifocals, primped, enthusiastically passionate, and ‘bout her business. She educated me on what sets her apart from the other nail shops, because I genuinely had no idea of the difference. She emphasized that she ran a nail boutique with plans to mobilize! Creating personal, friendly, and therapeutic rapport with her clients is very important to keep that unique factor about herself.

These two women stood out the most to me, but that doesn’t even describe a quarter of the amount of talent that was in the building. Comedians, chefs, painters, dancers, designers, you name it! For a complete visual of PSAFE3, visit them at www.PSAFE-atl.com

The crowd at PSAFE3 was very supportive of everyone, I was happy to see everyone being open and lending support to businesses they had no familiarity with. I had the chance to confirm that with two middle-aged sisters, Dennice and Natalie Williams, who were both there to support a friend of the family.

“We love the arts, like theatre, museums, etc., so  this is a little outside the box for us. We are enjoying ourselves, because it’s something different,” said Dennice. “It’s a good celebration of us without violence and negativity. It’s good to see our people come together

Steez Fiends Apparel hosts clothing and accessories for men, women, and children.

The vibe was definitely on! Conversations were flowing, handshakes were common, business cards were exchanged, and photographs were snapping for a strong four hours! This was the whole idea, of course!

“Our goals are to continue to grow into a household named event, deliver quality production, and provide our vendors, participants, and guests with three hours of nonstop entertainment and fun,” said Washington.

If happiness had a sound, I believe this is what it sounded like.

 

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Image credits: Jannah Bolds, psafe-atl.com, EazyImages, CKenneyVisuals